Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Resume Writing Tips for Cancer Survivors









The best way to find a job, of course, is by networking in person or through LinkedIn but no matter how great you are at relationship skills and self promotion for your career after cancer, you will still be asked for your resume.
A resume is an interesting piece of paper - but it is JUST a piece of paper. We are very attached to these pieces of paper but oftentimes they are out of date or unprofessional looking and that does not best highlight the jobseeker.

If your resume is not on point, it will be hard for you to move forward to the interviewing/job offer stage unless you are brought in based on the LinkedIn profile alone (which does sometimes happen) – even still, during the interview, people like to hold and read your resume. So all of these tactics do not matter if your resume is not as good as it could be. And this is all subjective but there are certain rules that apply to ALL resumes and especially for us working on our careers after cancer.
Your resume has to reflect your skills and talents and give your networking partners something to share and use to promote you. Here are my quick must haves on a resume:

  1. Summary section – This is the most important information about what makes you YOU that should be highlighted in bullet format right at the top of your resume. Why? Because people do not always read a whole document particularly if you are multiple pages in your resume (Note: Your resume should be no more than 2 pages) – you need to highlight the most important things about you right at the top.
  2. Great descriptors -  The essence of who you are that is highlighted in your summary should be solidified throughout your job descriptions. Remember the Skills Mapping exercise shared here - that should be what you use to pepper in to your skills and your job experience section. Try to have the words that are in the job description you like in your resume as these are the "buzz" or "key" words to get your through the screening process.
  3. Clean lines and professional email address – If you have a Hotmail email account, I am going to think you time traveled from 1999 to today. It should be your first name and last name at gmail with some tweaks, as needed if you have a common name.
  4. Include volunteering experience or a placeholder for "special projects" if you have a chronological "blank space" on your resume.
  5. Remember the resume is just a piece of paper but it is important for your career after cancer to have the best one possible to get to the interview - check this space for some insights on how to interview for your career after dealing with a serious health issue.


If you like this article, check out balanceaftercancer.org for more information and resources for your getting back to "normal" after cancer.

Follow us on Twitter @balancecancer or Instagram @balance_after_cancer or by clicking here.

Disclaimer: Writer of this article makes no guarantees about the content and everything should be cleared with you medical team and doctors. The information provided in this article is written by the writer for general information and the information should not be used without consulting with your own medical / legal team. This information is strictly for educational purposes and the author is not responsible for the outcomes if you follow aforementioned advice of the author. 



Lisa Vento Nielsen, MBA, PMP is an author, speaker, cancer survivor and career expert. Find out more at lisaventonielsen.com.

Monday, July 16, 2018

Using Social Media to Find Work for Cancer Survivors













For those of us who have been told, "You have cancer." we look for support and help everywhere and at times, despite statistics showing that more and more people are receiving cancer diagnoses, we find our "tribe" our "cancer" network through social media. We share things and receive love, support and make friendships and connections via our phones and social media. 
This is all great and so important - especially for me - so I imagine it is for you, too. The only drawback to sharing openly and connecting with others is that our "digital footprint" now shows that we have / had cancer. We should be open and not feel ashamed BUT hiring managers might not agree or be willing to take a chance on us because of our illness(es) - which is totally illegal, mind you, BUT how do you prove it? 
Before any interview or job offer, every hiring team across all industries googles their potential new employee. Think about googling yourself to see what comes up. If a lot of content or links talk about your health, you might want to consider doing these steps to "hide them" a bit.
To hide your illness from social media google searches:
1- Create another social media world based off of your career successes/professional aspirations in the hopes that this will come up before the illness items.
2- Change the name or identifying information on your personal social media accounts to help allow your professional name search NOT pull it up.
3-DO NOT BE ASHAMED by what you have shared - this is just because the mindset for hiring managers is, "Will this employee be a good fit? Will they mesh with our team? Will they be reliable and be in every day no matter what?" For some reason, being a cancer patient will make the hiring managers think, "This person could get sick/be sick/miss work - maybe we should move on to the stack of resumes that DO NOT have an illness." 
Now, for the second part of this process in using social media as a professional, here are some tips to start today. 
Identify Your Strategy: Identify your industry of interest or the skill you want to promote to stand out in said industry - the choice of how to do this is dependent on a) how much work experience you have and b) if you are changing industries or not. Ideally, you should be a "generalist" and able to move between industries by highlighting your skills alone but that does not always work so you can do a mix of the two sharing or pick one that works best for you.

Sharing Content: Once you decide on your strategy, decide on your plan of social media. What platforms should you use to stand out for your brand? Skip Facebook immediately - you can keep using that for personal reasons because it is hardly used for anything else by anyone. Instead, focus on Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn (of course).

I would include SnapChat but all anyone I know uses it for is to make themselves look like a puppy so maybe skip that for now until it becomes more mainstream..

Post it on Social Media: Now, being to share content around your industry / specialty.

With Instagram, you can snap photos of yourself preparing to give a training or with work colleagues celebrating something work related. You can also show pictures of you in business attire or quotes and/or image based text such as photo of your resume with some words included. There are apps to make an image look like a professional post such as Canva and TypiImage. You can use instaquote to draft a saying or a general lesson about your role or specialty and share that - like "Project Management - how to know how to do any task right" something catchy and interesting. You can share that on Instagram.

For Twitter, you can share articles about your dream company (favorable), industry (think pieces) and include a quick comment about it.

LinkedIn is the way to move mountains for your career, though. Share articles once or twice every 2 weeks and include your overview of the article. Consider writing your own piece for LinkedIn Pulse. Get out there are be your amazing professional self on all social media to help you find your career after cancer. 
If you like this article, check out balanceaftercancer.org for more information and resources for your career after cancer.
Follow us on Twitter @balancecancer or Instagram @balance_after_cancer or by clicking here.

Disclaimer: Writer of this article makes no guarantees about the content and everything should be cleared with you medical team and doctors. The information provided in this article is written by the writer for general information and the information should not be used without consulting with your own medical / legal team. This information is strictly for educational purposes and the author is not responsible for the outcomes if you follow aforementioned advice of the author. 



Lisa Vento Nielsen, MBA, PMP is an author, speaker, cancer survivor and career expert. Find out more at lisaventonielsen.com.

Friday, July 13, 2018

LinkedIn for Cancer Survivors










You can use LinkedIn to get noticed for your career. The networking service is loaded with folks you may have worked with who know people you may want to work with and so on and so forth. You can leverage this tool to start laying the groundwork for your career after cancer beginning today. 





Here are some of my best "rules" to use to get noticed on LinkedIn. 

1) Use LinkedIn to share industry related content - do not be "spammy" but do share occasional interesting to you news articles about the industry you want to join. When you are ready to do so, you can and should include a brief description about the article and why you are sharing it but be very careful to make sure your sentence structure is great and all spelling and grammar is perfect, too.  Try to do this at least once a month. Beware you do not post the same article twice.

2) Your summary on LinkedIn should be on point - it should boil down to your Elevator Value Pitch which I shared here already and that talks about who you are and what you can do.

3) Consider inviting people to connect with you in a professional way. If you are on an interview or at a networking event and find yourself really connecting well in person, you can and should ask if it would be acceptable for you to connect with them on LinkedIn. 

4) Always be professional on LinkedIn - your profile picture should be of just you in professional attire. Do not post things that would better be kept to Facebook or just off social media entirely.

5) Ask friends and former colleagues to recommend you on LinkedIn and offer to do the same for them. If they agree to do so, ask if they would like you to draft something so they can just copy and paste it to your profile. If they are not able or interested in doing that, ask them instead to just click on your skills for the ones they want to endorse you for on your profile (and offer to do the same).

Doing these simple steps - either 1 or all 5, can make your LinkedIn profile stand out for the right reasons and lead to potential calls and/or interview requests for your career after cancer.

A future article will focus on leveraging your contacts for your career after cancer by reaching out and asking for advice for your job hunt and more.


If you like this article, check out balanceaftercancer.org for more information and resources for getting back to normal after cancer.

Follow us on Twitter @balancecancer or Instagram @balance_after_cancer or by clicking here.

Disclaimer: Writer of this article makes no guarantees about the content and everything should be cleared with you medical team and doctors. The information provided in this article is written by the writer for general information and the information should not be used without consulting with your own medical / legal team. This information is strictly for educational purposes and the author is not responsible for the outcomes if you follow aforementioned advice of the author. 


Lisa Vento Nielsen, MBA, PMP is an author, speaker, cancer survivor and career expert. Find out more at lisaventonielsen.com.

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

What Are Your Skills?






Identify and leverage your skills for your career as a cancer survivor. 

Everyone is good at something (we happen to be good at surviving cancer - knock on wood - and knowing every day is a gift). Most people are too modest to promote and leverage what they are good at OR they are too full of self doubt to admit they have a skill at all.

Consider your skills as the things that come “easy” to you or what have you worked hard at to be able to do it “easily”. I understand if you doubt these skills given the trauma your body and mind has gone through - I get that so much. Have some faith in your abilities and think about 6 months after treatment or 2 years after treatment or if you are going to be in treatment for the duration of your life then just think about what you LOVE to do and see if those skills tie in to some work-related items. (Remember to always get your medical team's approval about working.) 



Assignment
List at least 3-5 skills that you have – this is not the skills section of your resume which should be full of actionable skills such as your computer, social media, technical skills – this is instead the things that should be DEMONSTRATED on your resume – so if you are a great project manager, you would have things on your resume demonstrating your prowess as a project manager (such as key accomplishments in successful projects you have run,etc).

What skills should you be demonstrating on your resume? What skills should jump off the page by reading your job descriptions and accomplishments?

Skills for you to print and fill out - just 5 to ease into it but if you have more than 5, write away!


  1. _______________________________________________
  2. _______________________________________________
  3. _______________________________________________
  4. _______________________________________________
  5. _______________________________________________

Resume
Now look at your resume; do those skills jump out at you through the page? Underline or highlight the pieces of your resume that map back to these skills – are there skills not showing through on the resume? How can you address that?

What about your LinkedIn profile? Can it be understood by your profile that you have these skills? If not, how can you make these skills “pop” via your descriptive content about who you are and what you bring to the table.

Get comfortable promoting yourself because if you do not do it, no one else will. Get comfortable highlighting the skills you have for your career after cancer.

In case you wanted to know, mine are:

  1. Writing
  2. Presenting
  3. Teaching
  4. Project Management
  5. Entrepreneurship


If you like this article, check out balanceaftercancer.org for more information and resources for getting back to normal after cancer.


Follow us on Twitter @balancecancer or Instagram @balance_after_cancer or by clicking here.

Disclaimer: Writer of this article makes no guarantees about the content and everything should be cleared with you medical team and doctors. The information provided in this article is written by the writer for general information and the information should not be used without consulting with your own medical / legal team. This information is strictly for educational purposes and the author is not responsible for the outcomes if you follow aforementioned advice of the author. 


Lisa Vento Nielsen, MBA, PMP is an author, speaker, cancer survivor and career expert. Find out more at lisaventonielsen.com.

Monday, July 9, 2018

Can You Volunteer To Find A Job?





Anyone who has been through a life changing diagnosis and found themselves out of work or looking for work should consider volunteering as a way to 

1- To fill in blank spaces on the resume: When you take time off (or are unceremoniously let go from a job during cancer and its treatments) you will have some blank spaces on your chronological timeline of jobs. Volunteering at an organization on a part time bases (if you are cleared to do so by your medical team) could be a good way to showcase you have work experiences in the midst of not working. 
2- To enrich you skills: Volunteering can allow you to stretch and practice new skills in a safe environment. There is not a lot of pressure involved with a volunteer role meaning that if you fail at a task, you cannot be fired - this is a good way to get acclimated back to thinking on your feet and talking about things other than blood counts and pet scans. 
3- Meeting new people: You will be out and about and building relationships with the folks in and around the organization for which you volunteer. 
4- Finding potential opportunities: You can network with these folks when you are ready to transition back to a paid position and maybe your volunteer role could even become your new job. 
5-Potential references: Even if you do not wind up working at the volunteer role, you can rely on the relationship you have built to give you a great reference for your next job.


When you are not working, you have a lot of time on your hands and you can only "job search" for so long each day. Being in the home and thinking about your health might just be a bad thing for you to be doing and if you are cleared to work and/or to do activity, you should consider volunteering.

What I learned from volunteering is:

  • How to lead people effectively – without true responsibility for staff or volunteers but being the focal point and the “leader” when you are really just someone there for a short amount of time is an amazing skill to exercise and keep fresh.
  • Using project management skills – I was able to take my love of all things project management and execute it with an actual thriving business and these skills have come with me as I use them with my small business, too.
  • Keeping my public speaking and communication skills sharp - just having the interaction and the ability to speak aloud was great practice for me.


What do you think about volunteering to get back to work after cancer? If you would like more information on getting back to work, check out www.thetimebetweenis.org



If you like this article, check out balanceaftercancer.org for more information and resources.

Follow us on Twitter @balancecancer or Instagram @balance_after_cancer or by clicking here.

Disclaimer: Writer of this article makes no guarantees about the content and everything should be cleared with you medical team and doctors. The information provided in this article is written by the writer for general information and the information should not be used without consulting with your own medical / legal team. This information is strictly for educational purposes and the author is not responsible for the outcomes if you follow aforementioned advice of the author. 

Lisa Vento Nielsen, MBA, PMP is an author, speaker, cancer survivor and career expert. Find out more at lisaventonielsen.com.

Friday, July 6, 2018

Quick - What's Your Elevator Pitch?








The elevator pitch has often been defined as what you would say to the CEO of your company if you were in the elevator together to prove yourself and leverage that time into getting on the radar of upper management. For us, though, in our quest for our career after cancer, the purpose of an elevator pitch is in identifying what our "best" skills are (besides being cancer superheroes and slightly radioactive) for people near and dear to us as well as people we meet at networking events can know what we bring to the table. I call this the Elevator Value Pitch (or an EVP, if you will for Elevator Value Pitch).


This means your old "elevator pitch" (if you had one) needs a makeover to highlight your VALUE of what you bring to any company, client or coworkers. Having this statement be ready and focused is, in my opinion, a  magic formula to ensuring people know who you are and what you can do. Yes, magic. If done right this is a quick 2 minute overview of who you are and what you do and can lead to opportunities. 






Here are my quick tips to creating and using an elevator value pitch (EVP) for you.


1) To do this right, you need to practice and hone your words so that it matches what you are and you must practice it so that it comes out naturally. Share it with close family and friends to see what they think of it. You could miss something because you are thinking about your career in a certain way. By sharing this potential EVP, you can make it more meaningful and robust.


2) No matter where you are in your career after cancer or where you want to be (financially solvent, health insurance or flex time) this is something everyone you know should be aware of - the highlight of who you are and what you can do / are looking for in your next step. 


3) You should have this "pitch" be part of your professional social media strategy - remember that you might be googled by hiring managers. You can "sneak" it into your LinkedIn profile maybe on the summary section and you can use it via Instagram and Twitter, too. It does not have to seem weird and do not overthink it. Consider creating an Instaquote  with your elevator pitch in bullets or sentences and share it. You share much more than that, I am sure.


Do not be embarrassed to present yourself as a professional using the platforms you usually appear relaxed on - it is okay to be complex.


4) You should share this via your close networking partners while asking them what they use to stand out in a crowded marketplace. This can be a great learning experience for you and your partners. Do not share this way with everyone you consider a networking partner; I am specifying to highlight those you are "close" with - those who you speak about career goals and whatnot.


5) For those you are not "close" with, consider how you can bring this information up and always know how to be ready to build out this "pitch" into actionable results. If you give your pitch to a new networking person, figure out how you can "show off" (in measure).  For example, if you state you are an excellent researcher, bring the conversation around to find out what the potential networking partner might need re research and then deliver some examples to them in a friendly way. Such as,


"Dear, X, It was so great to meet you at XYZ on Thursday night. I enjoyed our conversation about Z and I happened to see this during some of my research and thought it would help you in your work. Have a great day! Warmest regards, XXY"


Do not worry if you feel that you are "faking it until you make it". Cancer and its treatments are decimating to our confidence and, in our minds, to our abilities. However, YOU are still full of potential and possibilities.


Do you have an elevator pitch already? Does it meet the criteria of being an EVP? Does it showcase your strengths and abilities in a quick way? If not, try to create one today...If you need more resources for your career after cancer, check out careeraftercancer.org.





If you like this article, check out balanceaftercancer.org for more information and resources.

Follow us on Twitter @balancecancer or Instagram @balance_after_cancer or by clicking here.

Disclaimer: Portions of this article were posted by the author at thenextstep1234.com/blog. Writer of this article makes no guarantees about the content and everything should be cleared with you medical team and doctors. The information provided in this article is written by the writer for general information and the information should not be used without consulting with your own medical / legal team. This information is strictly for educational purposes and the author is not responsible for the outcomes if you follow aforementioned advice of the author. 


Lisa Vento Nielsen, MBA, PMP is an author, speaker, cancer survivor and career expert.Find out more at lisaventonielsen.com.

Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Bouncing Back After Cancer





Plan B's
One big lesson we learn as cancer patients is to always have a Plan B and to try not to sweat the small stuff. "Small stuff" includes managing our career however, we also like to eat and need to have health insurance and be busy to not think too much about mortality and so on and so forth.
Whether we lose our jobs or take time off or realize our careers are not fulfilling or cause us too much stress to continue, we do need to think about how we can "bounce back" in our careers.
Some ways to bounce back include:
  1. Learning a new skill or expanding on a current skill: Keeping our minds active in any way shape or form is important during and after a cancer diagnosis. 
  2. Be kind to yourself and do not expect yourself to be exactly what you were before - know that your brain and body has been through a lot and adjust your expectations accordingly.
  3. Get help from friends and family to review your resume and let you if you can improve it; ask them to submit your resume for any openings they know of that might fit your skills and talents. Ask them not to mention your recent health issue, if possible.
  4. Google yourself and see what comes up - it is illegal for a hiring manager to ask about your health issues however ALL hiring managers google potential employees. If you google yourself and your health history comes up then it can be considered "fair game" or you just might not even get the interview and not know why. If your information is out there (perhaps you were interviewed at a walk against cancer or you blog extensively about what happened to you as I do) then consider changing your blog settings to a "fake name" and/or create a "professional" website that comes up higher in the search engine.
  5. Ease back into work slowly - know that you are interviewing the new job as much as they are interviewing you - honor and listen to your gut instincts if you can hold out long enough on your budget/health insurance needs to find something that will bring you joy and not make you stressed.
I hope these tidbits help you get back to work after cancer. You can learn more about balance after cancer here.


If you like this article, check out balanceaftercancer.org for more information and resources for your career after cancer.

Follow us on Twitter @balancecancer or Instagram @balance_after_cancer or by clicking here.

Disclaimer: Writer of this article makes no guarantees about the content and everything should be cleared with you medical team and doctors. The information provided in this article is written by the writer for general information and the information should not be used without consulting with your own medical / legal team. This information is strictly for educational purposes and the author is not responsible for the outcomes if you follow aforementioned advice of the author. 

Lisa Vento Nielsen, MBA, PMP is an author, speaker, cancer survivor and career expert.Find out more at lisaventonielsen.com.

Monday, July 2, 2018

You Got Cancer & Now You Are Laid Off...

Many cancer patients and survivors are laid off (or fired). This post is not about the legality of said employer decision but instead about how to manage being laid off and how to consider getting back to work, if and when you are able to do so. Always check with your doctor regarding whether you are fit for work.






One of the main differences between being fired and laid off is just the wording and in what it means for you to look for a new role. No matter what, though, it results in the loss of your job and for us who have already lost so much during this life changing diagnosis, this is just what can be the straw that breaks the camel's back.


You go from being employed and for most of us that means having a purpose and a routine to losing that footing in the world which makes recovery and our sense of selves suffer. It is a challenge to "bounce back" from cancer and now you need to find a job. To deal with a layoff and cancer treatment, it is important to be flexible.


Now when you are told that your position is gone, the first thing you will do is feel angry, lost and maybe even ashamed (I did) but you need to take a deep breathe and consider some strategies to get as much as you can out of your previous employer. 


What to Negotiate... Some things you can negotiate for include*:
  • severance payments
  • lump sum payment 
  • career counseling or some other back end training and/or help for your next step
*Do not sign anything, though, without legal review.


If those options do not lead to anything look into short term disability through your state or unemployment benefits. Check with Human Resources or a local lawyer about your options.

What Next? No matter that you got "laid off" it is more important to move past it as soon as possible and begin planning on taking your next step. It can be tempting to take the decision made by the company too hard on top of your recent diagnosis and/or treatment. This can lead to you feeling depressed and that is the worst thing for healing. Try to think of this as a chance to start over someplace new or somehow find a better position. 

How to Move On...
Consider retraining and re-framing your skills by:
  • training on a new skill
  • attending seminars for networking and knowledge
  • volunteering to keep busy and active
Also, you can look at this time as a chance to heal and recover for as long as you can - we all have bills to pay, though, and working is a huge part of our identities. See more articles here about getting back to work after cancer.  



If you like this article, check out Balance After Cancer for more information and resources for your career after cancer.



Follow us on Twitter @balancecancer or Instagram @balance_after_cancer or by clicking here.

Disclaimer: Writer of this article makes no guarantees about the content and everything should be cleared with you medical team and doctors. The information provided in this article is written by the writer for general information and the information should not be used without consulting with your own medical / legal team. This information is strictly for educational purposes and the author is not responsible for the outcomes if you follow aforementioned advice of the author. 



Lisa Vento Nielsen, MBA, PMP is an author, speaker, cancer survivor and career expert. Find out more at lisaventonielsen.com.

Sunday, July 1, 2018

Working After a Cancer Diagnosis - On Treatments, Follow Ups and Finding Meaningful Work Again

Getting back to work after dealing with a cancer diagnosis and all that entails presents two issues:


1-and most important is being well enough to work and mentally able to focus on the tasks at hand - the last thing we feel ready to do during cancer is to find a new job but unfortunately, for many of us, it is just what we have to do full stop. Despite needing to take a year or more to get through treatment (hopefully as some of us are in treatment for the rest of our lives) we also need to get ourselves out there to do the things EVERYONE dreads to do regardless of their health status - INTERVIEWING and NETWORKING and all of the things that used to make our hearts go bump in the night but now we know are just means to an end. We need to eat, so we need to work We need to stop thinking about cancer, so we need to work… and herein lies issue number...
2 - we now are trying to put cancer behind us (if we are lucky enough to not be stage 4) yet now we have these pesky follow up appointments, daily pills and aches and pains and an understanding of our bodies and mortality than we never had before.
Many of the people that I am helping get back to work have such debilitating joint pains and fatigue that they are in follow ups and trying to figure out what it could be beyond just this “new normal”.

We need to be career ready and cancer ready at the same time -

We have plans and backup plans to our plans and contingencies but the real meat and potatoes of the issue is that we need to figure out what days we need to miss from work to keep things going as they are- how many visits will we need to attend? Is there a clinical trial we want to do and if yes, how many visits will that be and for most of us, our treatment hospitals are not so conveniently located to our places of work so it means more follow ups = “better care” = more times off from work = can’t make the equation work.
No matter the job, no matter the lip service we will receive, there is still the unwavering potential issue that someone thinks that we are a liability - that we need to take time off, that we are not as stellar as we are expected to be despite the poison pumping through our veins, the cells that did not do what they were supposed to in our bodies but instead wrecked havoc on our lives and our livelihoods. 
When I mentor people through my program about career after cancer the very big elephant in the room is how you can manage this new priority of taking care of YOU as well as being a decent employee and having a normal job where you do not have to panic about taking an afternoon for a follow up appointment. These types of working arrangements are out there - but the rub is in what to tell and when and how to figure out if this is the right role for YOU. It is all about YOU now - being happy in your role, liking what you do and having decent bosses and colleagues who do not clock your every minute…
Women who have become moms during their working careers understand this a bit - the whole idea of being “mommy tracked” at work which is going from an upward moving career to something that is just going down or stagnant. Well, in that vein, those of us who have had cancer, we have been "YOU TRACKED".

You Tracked = You realize now that your health and wellbeing is important

You realize you do not want to be somewhere where you have to pretend all day long that you care about what you are doing. You know you do not want pity and misunderstanding to plague you every day of your career - you want to be known as YOU the person who rocks out at spreadsheets, or social media or writing not the person who lost their hair and is on certain medications forever (or 5-10 years).
It might seem impossible if you are considering how to get back to work - you might feel lost or ashamed or unable to pretend you give a crap about deadlines and spreadsheets when you just had a countdown wall about how many chemos or radiations you had left to get back to this “normal” but I promise you it is doable. You just might need a little help to get there and that is why I founded my 501(c)(3) to provide some of that help.
Our lives took a hard right to the land of doctors and follow ups and fears but we do not have to live there forever. We need to think about how to balance our new sense of selves, our new understanding of mortality to help us figure out how to move forward and live again and as we all know, living means bills to pay, vacations to take, insurance to have, spending time with friends and families and not thinking too much about "what if". 
Good luck on the path to “you” and if I can help in anyway, click here.

If you like this article, check out balanceaftercancer.org for more information and resources.

Follow us on Twitter @balancecancer or Instagram @balance_after_cancer or by clicking here.


Disclaimer: Writer of this article makes no guarantees about the content and everything should be cleared with you medical team and doctors. The information provided in this article is written by the writer for general information and the information should not be used without consulting with your own medical / legal team. This information is strictly for educational purposes and the author is not responsible for the outcomes if you follow aforementioned advice of the author. 

Lisa Vento Nielsen, MBA, PMP is an author, speaker, cancer survivor and career expert. Find out more at lisaventonielsen.com. This article was originally posted on LinkedIn.com and thetimebetweenis.org/blog.

Press Release- Balance After Cancer Foundation - FREE Resources for Life After Cancer

We are so pleased to announce the press release has launched sharing all about the Balance After Cancer Foundation - please read it and s...