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Can You Volunteer To Find A Job?




Anyone who has been through a life changing diagnosis and found themselves out of work or looking for work should consider volunteering as a way to 

1- To fill in blank spaces on the resume: When you take time off (or are unceremoniously let go from a job during cancer and its treatments) you will have some blank spaces on your chronological timeline of jobs. Volunteering at an organization on a part time bases (if you are cleared to do so by your medical team) could be a good way to showcase you have work experiences in the midst of not working. 
2- To enrich you skills: Volunteering can allow you to stretch and practice new skills in a safe environment. There is not a lot of pressure involved with a volunteer role meaning that if you fail at a task, you cannot be fired - this is a good way to get acclimated back to thinking on your feet and talking about things other than blood counts and pet scans. 
3- Meeting new people: You will be out and about and building relationships with the folks in and around the organization for which you volunteer. 
4- Finding potential opportunities: You can network with these folks when you are ready to transition back to a paid position and maybe your volunteer role could even become your new job. 
5-Potential references: Even if you do not wind up working at the volunteer role, you can rely on the relationship you have built to give you a great reference for your next job.


When you are not working, you have a lot of time on your hands and you can only "job search" for so long each day. Being in the home and thinking about your health might just be a bad thing for you to be doing and if you are cleared to work and/or to do activity, you should consider volunteering.

What I learned from volunteering is:

  • How to lead people effectively – without true responsibility for staff or volunteers but being the focal point and the “leader” when you are really just someone there for a short amount of time is an amazing skill to exercise and keep fresh.
  • Using project management skills – I was able to take my love of all things project management and execute it with an actual thriving business and these skills have come with me as I use them with my small business, too.
  • Keeping my public speaking and communication skills sharp - just having the interaction and the ability to speak aloud was great practice for me.


What do you think about volunteering to get back to work after cancer? If you would like more information on getting back to work, check out www.thetimebetweenis.org



If you like this article, check out balanceaftercancer.org for more information and resources.
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Disclaimer: Writer of this article makes no guarantees about the content and everything should be cleared with you medical team and doctors. The information provided in this article is written by the writer for general information and the information should not be used without consulting with your own medical / legal team. This information is strictly for educational purposes and the author is not responsible for the outcomes if you follow aforementioned advice of the author. 

Lisa Vento Nielsen, MBA, PMP is an author, speaker, cancer survivor and career expert. She lost her job during treatment and founded a nonprofit focused on helping people who have been diagnosed with cancer (and their families) find meaningful work. Cancer takes a toll on your whole life and the lives of those in your family - working is a big part of getting back to "normal" after going through a cancer diagnosis. Survivorship is all that comes after diagnosis and it needed more resources so Lisa and her team created them. Find out more at lisaventonielsen.com.

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